The #Nigerian Air Force’s Alpha Jets – @NigAirForce


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Great article here about the Nigerian air force’s use of Alpha Jets in its counter-insurgency war against Boko Haram, and in previous missions in Liberia and Sierra Leone.

The Nigerian military has been bashed in the media in the last couple of years. It has not been given due credit though for its successful use and adaptation of a military aircraft that was regarded as obsolete. The Alpha Jets are supposed to be training planes; used to train air force pilots, before they are allowed into the cockpit of a “real” fighter jet. However the Nigerian air force has instead adapted a training plane into a fighting and bombing plane that it has used against Boko Haram, and against rebels in Liberia and Sierra Leone.

One thing that stood out for me is the technical ingenuity that Nigeria has demonstrated with this plane:

The Nigerian air force set about jerry-rigging onto two of the jet trainers its own weapons hardpoints capable of holding bombs or rocket pods.

Reportedly, the modifications cost just four million Nigerian naira — roughly $13,000. Some reports state a sum as low as $2,000. Given typical military equipment costs, this stands as a remarkable achievement. Foreign companies had requested up to $30,000 just to assess the cost of doing the refit.

A Nigerian car manufacturer, Innoson, has also been contracted to produce spare parts for the NAF to keep the old aircraft flying.

You can read the full story at this link: https://warisboring.com/nigerias-tiny-low-tech-alpha-jets-have-flown-in-brutal-wars-across-africa-5d843265d1b8#.vip9bxsq0

 

 

Storified @Okadabooks Twitter Interview with Max Siollun


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If you missed my live Twitter interview with Okadabooks, you can see the Storified record of it here. I discussed a lot: Nigeria, is history, the state of publishing, and even jollof rice and puff puff!;-)

If you want to read sample chapters of my book Soldiers of Fortune, you can download a sample chapter or two here. Then you can decide whether to read more, some, or all of the book.

The Role of Western Countries in African Corruption


This is an article I wrote in Foreign Policy about the role that Western countries play in African corruption.

Excerpts:

The Bandits’ Banker

It’s no secret that corruption is a problem in Africa. Some $50 billion in illicit finance flows out of the continent every year, according to the United Nations. In the first 40 years of independence alone, Nigeria’s leaders stole or
squandered an estimated $400 billion. But as the barbed comments from Buhari imply, these leaders had accomplices in the West. Britain and other developed countries are not the cause of Africa’s corruption, but they are certainly an impediment to its eradication.

 

African governments are fighting a battle on two fronts. Even when they successfully prosecute corruption at home, they often have to restart litigation in foreign countries to have any hope of accessing the stolen funds. In other words, they must litigate every crime twice: domestically to secure a conviction, and abroad to recover the money. This all but ensures that the stolen funds won’t be repatriated in full, since foreign lawyers typically collect a percentage of the money they recover. For African governments, illicit financial flows are lose-lose. But for Western firms, they’re win-win: There are profits to be made whether or not the money is eventually recovered and returned.

https://twitter.com/maxsiollun

 

Interview with Max Siollun – This Friday, 1:30pm #Nigeria Time


Chat With Max Flier114

 

My book Soldiers of Fortune is now available as an e-book on mobile devices via Okadabooks. I will do a live Twitter interview on Nigeria with OkadaBooks this Friday,  May 27, at 1.30am (8:30am USA Eastern Time).

You can download the book here and get a N2000 Naira Okadabooks credit.

You can follow the interview on Twitter via the hashtag #OkadaRideWithMax

 

Max Siollun Twitter Interview This Friday – 1:30pm #Nigerian Time


Chat With Max Flier114

 

My book Soldiers of Fortune is now available as an e-book on mobile devices via Okadabooks. I will do a live Twitter interview on Nigeria with OkadaBooks this Friday,  May 27, at 1.30am (8:30am USA Eastern Time).

You can download the book here and get a N2000 Naira Okadabooks credit.

You can follow the interview on Twitter via the hashtag #OkadaRideWithMax

 

Many #BokoHaram Members Have Never Read the Koran


Below is an article I wrote in the New York Times about the changing nature of Boko Haram’s threat and the likely next stage in the group’s evolution.

A few excerpts:

the group now seems to spend as much time engaged in banditry as it does fighting “Western education.” When officials from Nigeria’s Office of the National Security Adviser interviewed Boko Haram prisoners, they were told that most of the group’s soldiers “have never read the Quran.”

Also the group seems to be changing tactics:

Today, Boko Haram is no longer occupying large parts of Nigeria. Instead, it has morphed into a group of well-organized bandits. The military’s successes changed Boko Haram’s threat, but didn’t eliminate it.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/19/opinion/can-boko-haram-be-defeated.html?_r=0

Inside a #BokoHaram Deradicalisation Center in #Nigeria


Soldiers of Fortune – Now Available on #Nigerian Mobile Devices


For those of you that are e-book fans, you can now buy my book Soldiers of Fortune: a History of Nigeria (1983-1993) and read it on your mobile phone via Okadabooks at the link below. You can read a sample chapter or two, or download the entire book for only $7.54.

http://okadabooks.com/book/about/soldiers_of_fortune/11201?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

You can read a review of Soldiers of Fortune here.

26th Anniversary of the Orkar Coup in #Nigeria


Today is the 26th anniversary of the April 1990 coup attempt against General Babangida in Nigeria. Rather than rehash the events  (which I have written about before) in this post, I have instead included links where you can read all about the coup in an account by one of its plotters, and another view of the coup by General Babangida’s former Chief Security Officer.

That coup was a watershed in Nigeria, and accelerated the turn of events that led to the insurgency in the Niger Delta, and indirectly to the controversy that followed the June 12, 1993 election annulment, and the “power shift” to the south in 1999.

If you want to read more about the Orkar coup and these tumultuous years, you can of course do so in my book “Soldiers of Fortune: A History of Nigeria (1983-1993)“.

Have a great weekend everyone.

 

 

#Nigeria History Flashback: Sharia Comes to Northern Nigeria


https://t.co/w8RLtsUfeT
Witness by BBC on iTunes