Tag Archives: elections

#NigeriaDecides: Full Acceptance Speech of President-Elect Muhammadu Buhari


Two Things Nearly Certain After #NigeriaDecides: Result Dispute and Litigation


http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/mar/30/result-election-nigeria-faces-acid-test#comments

Two things are virtually certain, no matter who wins. The results will be disputed and there will be litigation

Ethno-Regional Voting in #Nigeria – Interactive Map


This is a very good visual showing political affiliations in Nigeria on a map. This colour coded map shows which states are governed by Governors of the ruling PDP, and which are governed by opposition Governors.

 

#Nigeria – #BokoHaram, 2015 Elections and Security Challenges


Video of an event that took place on Tuesday December 9 at Chatham House in London. Zainab Usman and Olly Owen of Oxford University along with Professor Kuna of INEC.

http://bcove.me/36cb21f7

http://bcove.me/3v1nfq14

How the June 12, 1993 Election in #Nigeria Was Annulled (by Prof Humphrey Nwosu)


Interview with former National Electoral Commission Chairman Professor Humphrey Nwosu regarding the annulment of the June 12, 1993 presidential election in Nigeria; which was won by Moshood Abiola.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=keSD3BCqsUo

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHO8KxgOtdg

APC, PDP and Nigeria’s Election Process


 

A lively debate in Washington DC in the USA between members of the APC and PDP about the electoral process in Nigeria ahead of the 2015 federal elections. There were some innovative suggestions by the panelists such as allowing Nigerians in Diaspora to vote, and filming the counting of votes at all polling stations as a way of preventing election rigging and fraud.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_qmLPc38Pk

Doyin Okupe was in combative mood!

 

The participants were:

Victor Ndoma-Egba (invited)
Senate Leader, Cross River State, People’s Democratic Party (PDP)

Dr. Doyin Okupe
Senior Special Assistant for Public Affairs, Government of Nigeria, PDP

Babafemi Ojudu
Senator, Ekiti State, All Progressives Congress (APC)

Sanya Awosan
Senior Special Assistant to the President

Fred Majemite
Political Adviserto Governor Uduaghan

Lai Mohammed
National Publicity Secretary, APC

Nigeria’s political leaders, candidates, and party supporters in laying the foundations for peaceful, credible elections in 2015. We hear from the leaders of the two main parties about their plans for the primary contests, and their strategies for enforcing good conduct among candidates, promoting issue-based rather than personality-driven campaigning, ensuring a tone of moderation in the debates, and encouraging respect for the election outcome. This conference is part of an ongoing series, supported by the Ford Foundation, bringing Nigerian officials, civil society activists, and opinion leaders to Washington, D.C. to engage with U.S. policymakers and Africa experts on how best to ensure that Nigeria’s 2015 elections are free, fair, and peaceful.

 

INEC to Register 80 Million for Nigeria Election


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sudI7NTjUb0

Report by Al-Jazeera on Nigeria’s voter registration exercise using software written by Nigerian Nyimbi Odero (a former Google employee).

How Governors Rig Elections, By Donald Duke


http://www.guardiannewsngr.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&layout=blog&id=16&Itemid=475

Great expose by former Cross River State Governor Donald Duke about the sophistication that goes into election rigging in Nigeria. Read and weep.

Goodluck Jonathan Interviewed on CNN by Christine Amanpour


On the back of his recent trip to the U.S., acting President Goodluck Jonathan was interviewed by Christine Amanpour of CNN. Interview Highlights:

1)    He has not seen Yar’Adua, nor have the government ministers.
2)    He has no idea about Yar’Adua’s state of health.
3)    He does not know whether Yar’Adua will ever return and resume his duties.
4)    His most pressing concern at the moment is electricity supply, and he has promised to hold a free and fair election next year where voters choice will actually count.
5)    He refused to be drawn on whether INEC Chairman Maurice Iwu would be sacked.
6)    He declined to confirm whether or not he will contest next year’s election.
7)    He was also asked about General Ibrahim Babangida’s intention to contest next year’s presidential election.
The full transcript of the interview is below:

AMANPOUR:

Thank you very much, indeed, for joining us on this program.

JONATHAN:

Thank you for finding time to discuss with me.

AMANPOUR:

Can I ask you first what an extraordinary name. How did “Goodluck” come to be your name?

JONATHAN:

I don’t know. I have to ask my father.

AMANPOUR:

Have you had good luck? And do you think you’ll need more than good luck to face down the incredible array of challenges that’s on your plate?

JONATHAN:

Well, the issue of good luck, I don’t really believe that the good luck an issue. But at the present, I’ve been facing a lot of challenges. What some people will attribute to good luck could have been disastrous under some circumstances.

AMANPOUR:

Well, let me ask you this. You are now acting president, because the president, Mr. Yar’Adua, is unwell.

JONATHAN:

Yes.

AMANPOUR:

Have you seen him since he has come back from his medical absence in Saudi Arabia?

JONATHAN:

No, I have not seen him.

AMANPOUR:

Why not?

JONATHAN:

The thinking of the family is that they should isolate him from most of the key actors in government. I have not seen him. The Senate president has not seen him …and at every single government function, I have not seen him.

AMANPOUR:

Doesn’t that cause anxiety amongst the people?

JONATHAN:

Yes, it does. It does. Obviously, it does, but we cannot influence his family’s thinking.

AMANPOUR:

Would you prefer that the family allowed you to visit him?

JONATHAN:

Yes, of course. But I will not want to force.

AMANPOUR:

What is his actual state of health? This also is a mystery.

JONATHAN:

I can’t say exactly. Only the medical doctors can.

AMANPOUR:

Have they told you?

JONATHAN:

No, they haven’t.

AMANPOUR:

Have they made any public statements?

JONATHAN:

Not quite. Not now. At the beginning, yes, but (Someone’s name – unclear) left for Saudi Arabia, I think in the second week or so, within the first week, we are told that acute pericarditis. After that, no other statement has been issued.

AMANPOUR:

So if he can receive religious leaders, why can he not receive at least the acting president who’s acting in his name?

JONATHAN:

Well, religious leaders are there for (inaudible) blessings. Probably that is why they asked the religious leaders to go and pray for him. We are a very, very religious society.

AMANPOUR:

Do you believe that those around him are trying to undermine you or your new cabinet?

JONATHAN:

I wouldn’t say they are trying to undermine me, because the laws of the land are very clear. And, of course, that is why in the first place constitution is designed for two people to be in charge of government at every time, one superior and one inferior.

AMANPOUR:

Do you think he will ever come back to government?

JONATHAN:

I can’t say that. It’s difficult for any of us as mortals to say so.

AMANPOUR:

So you are now acting president, and you have essentially a year, because elections will be held this time 2011.

JONATHAN:

Yes.

AMANPOUR:

What is your most pressing issue?

JONATHAN:

The most pressing issue for Nigerian now, in terms of basic infrastructure, is power.

AMANPOUR:

You mean electricity?

JONATHAN:

Electricity. Outside that, what is central to the minds of Nigerians now is an election that their votes will count, free and fair elections because we’ve been accused of as a country that our elections somehow are questioned. And I promise Nigerians that they will surely get that and I’ve done some experiments.

The next thing that Nigerians worry about is issues of corruption. You know we’ve been accused of as people who are in a privileged position in government amassing wealth at the expense of society. So they expect us to take these two issues seriously.

AMANPOUR:

So what can you do to take those issues seriously?

Obviously, the issue of good governance, of free elections, free of corruption is central, and you heard the United States has also said just now that you must remove the head of the election commission, Maurice Iwu. Will you do that?

JONATHAN:

You see, the issue of the – the electoral body – in fact, I even told the audience I addressed this morning, the issue is whether the present electoral body can conduct free and fair election or not. And I told them that, yes, they can, because I have done it with the same people.

On issue of the people at INEC, I told them that, look, between now and ending of June, most of the officials at the national level – they’re called commissioners – their tenure will end, and we’re going to review them on individual merit.

Within this period that I have been acting president, I have conducted three elections. They are conducted by INEC and it was free and fair. Only on Saturday, we conducted local council elections in the federal capital territory and all the information is that, apart from one or two that had some few discrepancies, they have been very peaceful, very credible… So that is the issue. So the issue is beyond one person.

AMANPOUR:

But let me just ask you…

JONATHAN:

I’m not defending the chairman.

AMANPOUR:

Do you think he will stay or will he be removed?

JONATHAN:

All of them we’ll review. And any one of them that we feel is not competent definitely…

AMANPOUR:

Do you feel that Mr. Iwu is competent?

JONATHAN:

(Laughs) No, no, no, no. I know that this question continues to come up.

What I’ve said is… the issue is beyond Mr. Iwu.

AMANPOUR:

I know. But I’m specifically talking about him, because it’s come up in your meetings with U.S. officials.

JONATHAN:

Yes, I agree that within the period that is (inaudible) there are quite a number of controversies. I agree. There are quite a number of concerns. There are quite a number of controversies. So I know what I’m telling you; that this very Iwu, I’m not trying to argue for him. The Iwu we are talking about has conducted free elections these past three elections that I’ve made reference to that are credible.

So the issue is beyond Iwu because we must set up an electoral system and our regulations and laws that will make sure that anybody who is appointed to that office should be able to conduct acceptable elections. And that is my focus.

AMANPOUR:

OK. Will you run in 2011? Will you present yourself as a presidential candidate?

JONATHAN:

For now, I don’t want to think about it, because the circumstances that – the circumstances of the day are quite worrisome.

I came in as the vice president to run with President Yar’Adua, of course, getting close to period of election, he took ill. And I have to take over under somewhat controversial circumstances. Only last week, I reconsidered the cabinet. So let us see how Nigeria will move forward first. I had a similar experience when I was governor of my state.

I said, nobody should ask me whether I will contest election or not. I must first of all see whether the state is moving. If the country is not moving, what what will I tell Nigerians I want to contest?

The full interview will air on ‘Amanpour’ at 2000 BST on Wednesday 14th April

Videos on the June 12 Annulment


Without wishing to turn the site into a video fest, I think these videos on the annulment of the June 12, 1993 election are another didactic series.  Each of the three videos runs for about 10 minutes.  I’ve been having problems with some of the videos so if the video screens don’t work, click the URL link below each screen and that will take you directly to a youtube link of the video.

Part 1

http://www.viewnaija.com/video/344/IBB-on-June-12-annulment-Part-1

Part 2

http://www.viewnaija.com/video/345/IBB–June-12-annulment–Part-2

Part 3

http://www.viewnaija.com/video/1455/Behind-the-June-12th-Election–1