Tag Archives: liberia

Dr Stella Adadevoh – #Nigeria “Heroine Doctor” Who Prevented Spread of #Ebola


Recollections from from the son (and colleagues) of Dr Stella Ameyo Adadevoh who managed to contain the spread of Ebola in Nigeria after Liberian national Patrick Sawyer brought the virus into Nigeria. Sawyer may have spread the Ebola virus to Dr Adadevoh and other medical staff after he resisted Dr Adadevoh’s instruction for him to be kept in hospital under observation. He apparently pulled out intravenous tubes and splashed his blood on medical staff at the hospital.

 

“She was fine all along and then suddenly it became apparent. We were seeing little signs and so of course there was panic and confusion,” says the 26-year-old.

These were the early days of the Ebola outbreak and Nigeria was not ready. Dr Adadevoh had already gone to inspect Lagos’s rudimentary Ebola treatment centre, and had described it as “uninhabitable”, Mr Cardoso says.

‘Kidnapping charge’

“So, when she had to go in she was, of course, very worried,” recalls Mr Cardoso who followed behind the ambulance in his car.

Dr Adadevoh had earlier already won a different battle – to isolate Mr Sawyer. He had not taken kindly to being told he could not leave.

“Immediately, he was very aggressive. He was more intent on leaving the hospital than anything else,” says Dr Benjamin Ohiaeri, the director of First Consultant Hospital.

“He was screaming. He pulled his intravenous [tubes] and spilled the blood everywhere.”

It has been suggested that Mr Sawyer, who had already lost a sister to Ebola, was not interested in medical assistance as he had set his mind on visiting one of Nigeria’s popular Pentecostal churches in search of a cure from one of the so-called miracle pastors.

During those early days caring for Mr Sawyer whilst awaiting the result of the blood test, Dr Adadevo came under intense pressure to let him leave – a move that could have had catastrophic consequences.

“The Liberian ambassador started calling Dr Adadevo, putting pressure on her and the institution. He felt we were kidnapping the gentleman and said it was a denial of his fundamental rights and we could face further actions,” says Dr Ohiaeri, adding that the hospital trusted Dr Adadevo’s judgment.

School children washing their hands, Lagos, Nigeria - Wednesday 8 October 2014Health workers stress the importance of basic hygiene to prevent the virus from spreading
Volunteers bury the body of an Ebola victim in Sierra LeoneStrict precautions must be observed when burying those who have died of Ebola

“The only way we could be sure and live up to our responsibility to our people, the state and nation – this is all about patriotism at the end of the day – was to keep him here.”

Mr Sawyer died in the hospital from Ebola. Dr Adadevoh and eleven of her colleagues caught the virus.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-29696011

Charles Taylor Sentenced to 50 Years in Prison


Liberia’s ex-President Charles Taylor has been sentenced to 50 years in jail by the UN war crimes court in the Hague (Special Court for Sierra Leone). Judge Lussick passed the sentence. Taylor is the first Head of State to be sentenced to jail by a war crimes court.

 

xr7h1q_liberia-s-taylor-jailed-for-50-years-for-war-crimes_news

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-18259596

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/may/30/charles-taylor-sentenced-50-years-war-crimes

Former Liberian Leader Charles Taylor Guilty of War Crimes


The United Nations Special Court for Sierra Leone had found Liberia’s former president, Charles Taylor, guilty of aiding, planning and abetting war crimes and crimes against humanity. This is the first-ever such international judgment against a former head of state.

The trial has been going on for several years and even had “celebrity” witnesses like Mia Farrow and supermodel Naomi Campbell.

Taylor’s ex-wife claims he is not guilty:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/liberia/9228038/How-blood-diamond-warlord-Charles-Taylor-was-brought-to-justice.html

Former Liberian Leader Samuel Doe – America’s “Step Child”


 

Great documentary series on how America supported former Liberian President Samuel Doe.  It chronicles the 1980 coup in which soldiers overthrew, killed and disembowelled the former President William Tolbert.  Master Sergeant Samuel Doe (as he then was) succeeded Tolbert as Liberia’s Head of State.

The barely literate Doe was clearly not fit to lead a country.  Yet he was propped up with American aid, led a tyranny in which he favoured his Krahn ethnic group and Liberia eventually descended into civil war.
One of the most astonishing quotes from this series is an American diplomat who said of Doe:
“He should have lost but he rigged the election. But at that time all west African elections were rigged. It was a very normal thing to do… for the government to ‘win’ the election even though they may have had less than a majority of the vote.  It did not trouble us at all.”

 

Johnny Mad Dog


One of the most emotional and harrowing films about child soldiers and the civil war in Liberia. The film’s “actors” include actual child soldiers. For those who want a realistic depiction of the brutality of Liberia’s civil war – watch this emotive film.

Blood Diamonds: Naomi Campbell Gives Evidence at Charles Taylor’s Trial


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/video/2010/aug/09/charles-taylor-liberia

Sensationally, supermodel Naomi Campbell has testified at the war crimes trial of former Liberian warlord and President Charles Taylor at the Hague.  Naomi Campbell was apparently given a “blood diamond” by Charles Taylor. There has been contradictory evidence as to whether Campbell actually knew the source of the diamonds. She admits receiving “dirty looking stones” from two men she did not know, but other witnesses like Mia Farrow and Campbell’s former agent have given contradictory evidence to Campbell – and alleged that she knew they were from Charles Taylor.

Campbell’s agent alleged that Campbell was “flirting” with Charles Taylor and was disappointed that the diamond was not as big as she hoped.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/law/2010/aug/05/naomi-campbell-court-blood-diamonds