Making Sense of President Jonathan’s New Military Appointments


POST

PREVIOUS HOLDER

NEWLY APPOINTED

Chief of Defence Staff Admiral Ola Sa’ad Ibrahim Air Marshal Alex Badeh
Chief of Army Staff Lt-General Azubike Ihejirika Major-General Kenneth Tobiah Jacob Minimah
Chief of Air Staff Air Marshal Alex Badeh Air Vice Marshal Adesola Nunayon Amosu
Chief of Naval Staff Vice-Admiral Dele Ezeoba Rear-Admiral Usman Jibrin

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4exYjPf_3rU

 

There has been a lot of “noise” in the Nigerian media about President Goodluck Jonathan’s supposedly controversial appointment of new military service chiefs for the army, air force, and navy.

To cut a long story short the main talking points are:

  • The new heads of the army, air force, and navy appointed by President Jonathan are (respectively): Major-General Kenneth Minimah, Air-Vice Marshal Adesola Amosu, and Rear-Admiral Usman Jibrin. They replaced Lt-General Azubuike Ihejirika, Air Marshal Alex Badeh, and Vice-Admiral Dele Ezeoba (respectively). Badeh is actually still employed though. Although he was replaced as Chief of Air Staff, he was promoted to replace Admiral Ola Sa’ad Ibrahim who was also retired. Net effect = one promotion and three retirements.
  • Expect the following rank promotions shortly: Badeh to Air Chief Marshal, Minimah to Lt-General, Amosu to Air Marshal, and Jibrin to Vice-Admiral. Promotions at this level of the armed forces usually require the heads of the army, air force, and navy to be three star generals (or equivalent), and the chief of defence staff to be a four star general (or equivalent). Badeh is currently equivalent to a three star general, and Minimah, Amosu, and Jibrin have two stars. Those ranks will probably change shortly.

Prior to the current appointments, the new men held the following posts:

Air Vice-Marshal Badeh – Chief of Air Staff

Major-General Minimah – Commander of the Nigerian Army Infantry Corps, Jaji.

Rear-Admiral Jibrin – Director of Training at Defence Headquarters.

Air Vice Marshal Amosu – Air Officer Commanding Tactical Air Command, Makurdi.*

*The statement announcing the new appointments by President Jonathan’s spokesman Reuben Abati actually messed up Amosu’s post by simultaneously claiming he was the head of the presidential air fleet, AND Air Officer Commanding, Tactical Air Command of the air force! Obviously Amosu could not have been in two different posts simultaneously.

People are literally foaming at the mouth with rage for a number of reasons. Namely:

  • The new Chief of Army Staff Major-General Minimah is from the Niger Delta, like President Jonathan.  Minimah is from Rivers State – right “next door” to the President’s home state of Bayelsa. The President is being accused of ethnic favouritism.
  • Apparently over 30 (or 50 depending on who you believe) senior officers were bypassed in order to appoint Minimah. These officers will now be retired as they cannot serve under Minimah, who is junior to them.

Minimah graduated from the Nigerian Defence Academy (NDA) in 1981 as a member of the NDA’s 25th regular combatant course. Amosu is also a graduate of course 25, while Jibrin is slightly senior to Minimah and Amosu, and is a graduate of course 24. The new Chief of Defence Staff Badeh was a graduate of course 21.

What do all these references to various courses mean? The military is a hierarchical institution. It is not a hospital or manufacturing plant. When people get promoted, life does not just go on as normal. In a country like Nigeria which was under military rule for 28 years, military promotions have national security AND political implications. Heads of state have been assassinated and coups staged as a result of the mismanagement of military promotions. Therefore there is a well-established tradition that when a military officer is promoted to head any of the armed services, any officers who are senior to him are retired or removed from his operational command. This nips potential disaffection (and political crises) in the bud. It has been happening for several decades.

We do not know why President Jonathan appointed Minimah (maybe because he is a star, the best, he’s comfortable with him, he trusts him, because he’s from the Delta…). Whatever the reason, once Minimah (an officer from NDA regular course 25) got appointed to replace Ihejirika (an officer from course 18) – lots of officers from courses 19-24 had to go.

This has happened lots of times before. Several senior officers were retired to make way for Minimah’s predecessor Ihejirika!  When former President Obasanjo retired Chief of Army Staff Lt-General Victor Malu (a course 3 graduate) in 2001, Obasanjo retired a lot of officers to make way for Major-General Alexander Ogomudia (also from the Delta – and four intakes below Malu) to become the new chief of army Staff.  As far back as 1990 President Babangida also ignored lots of senior officers like Major-Generals Nasko, Duba, Useni, Nwachukwu, Haladu etc in order to make way for Salihu Ibrahim (who was junior to all of them) as the new chief of army staff. Lots of fine officers had to retire to make way for Ibrahim.

Military appointments in the General ranks are effectively political appointments because of the visibility and political sensitivity of such appointments. President Jonathan is currently embattled and is facing attacks on multiple fronts from his political opponents. Senior members of his political party are defecting and next year he is facing a mammoth presidential election against an opposition that is resolutely determined to get rid of him.  However these overarching political events should not overstate the significance of what in most other countries would be routine military postings.

Are we really surprised that the President retired men who have been in service for over 35 years, some of whom are close to 60 years old? They had already passed the mandatory service limit of 35 years for military officers and were due for retirement any day. Their continued presence in service was at the prerogative of the President (AKA the Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces). What President Jonathan has done with these military appointments is not remarkable and is no different to what his predecessors have been doing for four decades.

Max Siollun

https://twitter.com/maxsiollun

About these ads

9 responses

  1. Adedayo Lamikanra | Reply

    Good and interesting write up..love it..welpdone sir…

  2. I’m Grateful For The Update.Am About To Write an Aptitude Test Today,thanks

  3. Some of the new appointees are on the wrong side of 55 years, as well.

  4. Williams phills | Reply

    Goodluck shud nt be criticies after all his nt d first president to appoint a jonior officer in to dat post its hav been hapend for decards,real admiral babalola is a vry gud man i whch to here nxt promotion dat he will be d chife of naval staff.

  5. Ekuson Debango | Reply

    We can actually go a little further when Ironsi appointed Lt. Col. Gowon as Chief of Staff, Army.This virtually gave Gowon operational control of the army over the likes of Babafemi Ogundipe and Adeyinka Adebayo and probably many more who were senoir to Gowon. The bottom line is that the president should choose his service chiefs even if his Chief of Army Staff happens to be his own brother. The are all serving officers and experienced officers to boot.They serve in these capacities at the pleasure of the president. One wonders why all the clamour by different groups to appoint certain persons to these positions.

    1. Welcome back Ekuson. :-) Actually, when Ironsi appointed Gowon as Chief of Staff, Army – the post was a staff appointment at army HQ. It did not give Gowon the sort of operational command of the troops like the modern day COAS has.

  6. Ekuson Debango | Reply

    I am curious to know what you folks make of the current standoff between the CDS Alex Badeh and thenewly appointed minister of defence Lt. General Gusau? The CDS was reported to have said, among other things, that he will not meet with the deputy defence minister whom he called an “idle” civilian. He also demanded to meet with the minister of defence one-on-one without the presence of the other service chiefs. This is quite unusual to say the least. I have read comments of support for the CDS elsewhere but I have to say that I totally disagree with such sentiment.What do people think? Does this portend something more sinister in the offing as we know that the acting minister of defence, Labaran Maku was roundly criticized for admonishing the military not to execute a coup shortly before handing over the portfolio to the new minister of defence.

  7. Interesting

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,399 other followers

%d bloggers like this: